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thisbigcity:

massurban:

Urban Times: 
“Are Our Greatest Cities Destroying Their Greatest Assets?
Around the world, city authorities are developing unstructured creative spaces into more lucrative commercial or residential zones – but the ability to generate more income from these areas comes at a cultural cost.
Tom Payne. 
London, Paris, New York and Hong Kong are just some of the world’s ‘global cities’. Not only are they major nodes of political and economic power, but they have the ability to disseminate ideas, trends and technologies across the world. Sadly, recent economic and physical changes in such cities are leading to the destruction of some of their most important assets. London’s Southbank Undercroft is the latest to come under the knife.
Youthful, creative spaces are being razed around the world to make way for ritzy apartments, “kitchy” cafes and manicured public spaces. In order to appeal to the world’s elite, these cities create new places of consumption at the expense of existing inner city spaces.
The shabby buildings and public spaces that don’t fit into the glossy and glamorous ideal of what cities should look like also happen to be the last remaining inner city places that young people have to hang out. As places of mass consumption are created for people with mass salaries, cities are losing their ability to cater to diversity. Young urban populations are losing important spaces they require to create ideas and build networks.”
Photo: Piero/Flickr

A discussion worth having: what is the value of cultural authenticity in face of glamourous redevelopment?

thisbigcity:

massurban:

Urban Times: 

“Are Our Greatest Cities Destroying Their Greatest Assets?

Around the world, city authorities are developing unstructured creative spaces into more lucrative commercial or residential zones – but the ability to generate more income from these areas comes at a cultural cost.

Tom Payne. 

London, Paris, New York and Hong Kong are just some of the world’s ‘global cities’. Not only are they major nodes of political and economic power, but they have the ability to disseminate ideas, trends and technologies across the world. Sadly, recent economic and physical changes in such cities are leading to the destruction of some of their most important assets. London’s Southbank Undercroft is the latest to come under the knife.

Youthful, creative spaces are being razed around the world to make way for ritzy apartments, “kitchy” cafes and manicured public spaces. In order to appeal to the world’s elite, these cities create new places of consumption at the expense of existing inner city spaces.

The shabby buildings and public spaces that don’t fit into the glossy and glamorous ideal of what cities should look like also happen to be the last remaining inner city places that young people have to hang out. As places of mass consumption are created for people with mass salaries, cities are losing their ability to cater to diversity. Young urban populations are losing important spaces they require to create ideas and build networks.”

Photo: Piero/Flickr

A discussion worth having: what is the value of cultural authenticity in face of glamourous redevelopment?

simpleflaw:

This is perfection.

simpleflaw:

This is perfection.

simpleflaw:

The best.

simpleflaw:

The best.

The State is the coldest of all cold monsters. Coldly it lies, too; and this lie creeps from its mouth: `I, the State, am the People.’… Everything about it is false; it bites with stolen teeth.
Friedrich Nietzsche (via your-maj3sty)